CLIMATE CHANGE provides space for lengthy pieces which elaborate IMAGINATIVE ACTION

 

SUMMER 2020

Dear Readers,

We are changing the focus of this page from TALES to CLIMATE CHANGE.

Whilst important and loved as are the longer stories in Tales, the urgent priority is getting ALL our heads around NOW ACTION.

So, each month we’ll jot down examples of ‘The Imagination Acts’ belief ….that, you and me can DO something when we leap with the parachute of our IMAGINATIONS on our backs.

 

******************************************************

 

Greta Thunberg: Climate change ‘as urgent’ as coronavirus –

Interview – with

 

Greta Thunberg says the world needs to learn the lessons of coronavirus and treat climate change with similar urgency.

That means the world acting “with necessary force”, the Swedish climate activist says in an exclusive interview with BBC News.

She doesn’t think any “green recovery plan” will solve the crisis alone.

And she says the world is now passing a “social tipping point” on climate and issues such as Black Lives Matter.

“People are starting to realise that we cannot keep looking away from these things”, says Ms Thunberg, “we cannot keep sweeping these injustices under the carpet”.

She says lockdown has given her time to relax and reflect away from the public gaze.

Ms Thunberg has shared with the BBC the text of a deeply personal programme she has made for Swedish Radio.

READ MORE – HERE

 

******************************************************

Greta Thunberg’s speech at UN Climate Change COP24 Conference (December 2018)

 

15 year old activist Greta Thunberg speaks truth to power at the UN COP24 climate talks:

” My name is Greta Thunberg. I am 15 years old. I am from Sweden. I speak on behalf of Climate Justice Now.

Many people say that Sweden is just a small country and it doesn’t matter what we do. But I’ve learned you are never too small to make a difference. And if a few children can get headlines all over the world just by not going to school, then imagine what we could all do together if we really wanted to.

But to do that, we have to speak clearly, no matter how uncomfortable that may be. You only speak of green eternal economic growth because you are too scared of being unpopular. You only talk about moving forward with the same bad ideas that got us into this mess, even when the only sensible thing to do is pull the emergency brake. You are not mature enough to tell it like is. Even that burden you leave to us children.

But I don’t care about being popular. I care about climate justice and the living planet. Our civilization is being sacrificed for the opportunity of a very small number of people to continue making enormous amounts of money. Our biosphere is being sacrificed so that rich people in countries like mine can live in luxury. It is the sufferings of the many which pay for the luxuries of the few.

The year 2078, I will celebrate my 75th birthday. If I have children maybe they will spend that day with me. Maybe they will ask me about you. Maybe they will ask why you didn’t do anything while there still was time to act. You say you love your children above all else, and yet you are stealing their future in front of their very eyes. Until you start focusing on what needs to be done rather than what is politically possible, there is no hope. We cannot solve a crisis without treating it as a crisis. We need to keep the fossil fuels in the ground, and we need to focus on equity. And if solutions within the system are so impossible to find, maybe we should change the system itself.

We have not come here to beg world leaders to care. You have ignored us in the past and you will ignore us again. We have run out of excuses and we are running out of time. We have come here to let you know that change is coming, whether you like it or not. The real power belongs to the people.

Thank you.”

 

******************************************************

UK arts’ leading figures join call for green recovery from coronavirus crisis

 

The chiefs of scores of the UK’s foremost arts and culture organisations have joined the call for a green recovery from the coronavirus crisis, even as their own sector faces the biggest threat to its existence in modern times.

Sir Mark Rylance, Neil Tennant of the Pet Shop Boys, Brian Eno and the leaders of the Tate and National Youth Theatre are among those signing a letter asking the government to adopt green and carbon-cutting targets alongside its economic rescue plans. Close to 400 arts leaders and prominent individuals have now signed the letter, which will be presented to the culture secretary, Oliver Dowden, this week.

“What we decide now will create the sustainable foundations for the future; we have a once-in-a-generation opportunity to build a resilient recovery plan that is fair and tackles the climate and ecological crisis with urgency. We cannot let this opportunity pass us by,” they wrote.

But many want the government to go further, and commit to an economic recovery that would prioritise green jobs and ensure that climate goals are taken into account in government spending. They want to avoid the rebound in carbon emissions that a return to business as usual would entail.

“Things are very grim for the culture sector, and these are really catastrophic circumstances – that people are gathering round the call for a green recovery says a lot about the sector,” said Alison Tickell, founder of Julie’s Bicycle, a non-profit company helping the arts sector become more environmentally sustainable, and organiser of the letter. “Arts people feel a real responsibility to the public, with a strong sense of a social contract in the way the arts speak to people.”

Before the coronavirus, many arts and cultural organisations were re-evaluating their sponsorship arrangements with fossil fuel companies, with the National Theatre ending its sponsorship deal with Shell, and the Royal Shakespeare Company giving up its backing from BP. Despite the immediate threat to the viability of the sector, which contributes about £112bn a year to the UK economy – more than the automotive and aerospace sectors – arts organisations have not abandoned their quest for sustainability.

Frances Morris, director of Tate Modern, told the Guardian: “Government commitment to a long-lasting and inclusive green recovery programme is a crucial and urgently required step to creating a future in which we cannot just survive but thrive.”

Arts organisations have been taking their own steps to green their operations, for instance through upgrading their energy systems, switching to electric vehicles, and cutting down on waste.

The prime minister has made references to the need for a sustainable recovery, but so far there has been no concrete plan for ensuring that the hundreds of billions to be spent on the economic recovery will “build back better” instead of propping up the high-carbon economy. Much of the money spent so far has gone to heavy emitters such as airlines, carmakers and oil companies, with no green strings attached.

The UK is seen as holding a particular responsibility because it will host the next vital UN summit on the climate, next year in Glasgow. Ministers will face a key test this week when its statutory advisers, the committee on climate change, are expected to warn that carbon reduction targets will be missed without swift action.

READ MORE-  HERE 

Acknowledgement – Fiona Harvey, Guardian Environment correspondent 22/6/20

Mark Rylance Photograph: Andreas Rentz/Getty Images

******************************************************

PREVIOUS CLIMATE CHANGE

May 2019

Click here to read more

PREVIOUS TALE

The Red Thread Project

Click here to read more

PREVIOUS TALE

Places of Belonging

Click here to read more

PREVIOUS TALE

Equality Teaching

Click here to read more

PREVIOUS TALE –

Tales of Constancy

Click here to read more

PREVIOUS TALE –

Doing nothing is not an option

Click here to read more

PREVIOUS TALE –

War Horse

Click here to read more

PREVIOUS TALE –

Permaculture

Click here to read more

PREVIOUS TALE –

Friend’s Tales

Click here to read more

PREVIOUS TALE –

From Holyhead to Hollywood
– the journey of Graham Wyn Jones :
Storyboard Artist

Click here to read more

PREVIOUS TALE –

Shoulder to Shoulder: With Victims

Click here to read more

PREVIOUS TALE –

The Lighthouse Story

Click here to read more

PREVIOUS TALE –

The beginning of “Wells for India’

Click here to read more

PREVIOUS TALE –

I Paint

Click here to read more

PREVIOUS TALE –

The Circle Works – Celebrating 30 Years

Click here to read more

PREVIOUS TALE –

Alert Ascot

Click here to read more

PREVIOUS TALE –

Ascent Festival

Click here to read more

PREVIOUS TALE –

Aching and yearning for the wild: The experience of children in the garden

Click here to read more

PREVIOUS TALE –
Just Walk to Jerusalem

Click here to read more

PREVIOUS TALE – ‘The NHS Crisis or Opportunity’

click here to read more

PREVIOUS TALE – ‘Take Two’

click here to read more